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Environmental governance

Environmental activities are carried out in Enel through an organization that is broken down into operational units and coordinated, as regards the general environmental policy guidelines, by a unit of the Parent Company. In the Business Lines and global service Functions there are responsible structures and figures at various levels (see also the chapter “Decarbonization of the energy mix”).
In particular, the corporate Functions coordinate the management of the respective environmental issues, providing the necessary specialist assistance in accordance with the guidelines of the Parent Company, and the operating units manage specific aspects affecting various industrial sites. In the Group in 2016 staff working on the handling of environmental issues numbered 371 Full-Time Equivalents (FTE). In the year training was undertaken for a total of around 79 thousand hours regarding Environmental Management Systems (such as the management of water and waste, environmental recovery, prevention, and integrated security systems).

In particular, around 40% regarded distribution, while the remainder focused on traditional generation and renewables. In addition, periodically mapping takes place of the main environmental risks; the MAPEC – Mapping of Environmental Compliance – system used in the past, is no longer adopted owing to the changes made in the organization of the Group, and was replaced by ad hoc analyses conducted on specific environmental issues by the individual Business Lines, such as for example ECoS (Extra Checking on Site) checks carried out by the Generation Business Line, in order to define and monitor the significant areas (see also the chapter “Occupational health and safety”).

Environmental Management Systems

A key element in the environmental policy is the gradual application to all the activities undertaken by the Enel Group of internationally recognized Environmental Management Systems (EMS).
As from 2012, when the Enel Group obtained ISO 14001 certification for the first time the application of EMS has been gradually expanding and now de facto covers almost 100% of the activities (production plant, networks, services, property, sales, etc.). The certification does not cover only newly acquired or newly built assets.Also for the new assets, specific activities are planned to adopt EMS. The Group certificate harmonizes the application of the environmental policy to all the activities and the consequent constant control and the verification of all the certifications.
The verification of implementation of the policy and the Group environmental program enable maintenance of the whole scope which is constantly protected by the Environmental Management System ISO 14001.

certificato

Environmental spending

In 2016 the total financial commitment for environmental protection and safeguarding was 1,049 million euro, of which 680 million was for current expenses and 369 million for investments. Current expenses, excluding the 53% share spent to buy emission certificates (around 359 million euro), concerned mainly the segment relating to thermal production, followed by nuclear and by geothermal. The diagram shows the percentages of spending divided by environmental themes. 

Environmental spending



Investments of 369 million euro rose compared to the previous year (+18%) and mainly concerned existing plants. In the environmental sector investments mainly concerned air and climate protection, followed by the protection of biodiversity and countryside.
Current environmental expenses

Investments of 369 million euro rose compared to the previous year (+18%) and mainly concerned existing plants. In the environmental sector investments mainly concerned air and climate protection, followed by the protection of biodiversity and countryside.

Environmental investments (%)

Reference SDGs: 
Main actionsTargets
Reduction of SO2 specific emissions-30% by 2020 (vs. 2010) 
Reduction of NOx specific emissions-30% by 2020 (vs. 2010) 
Reduction of particulates -70% by 2020 (vs. 2010)
Reduction of specific water consumption-30% by 2020 (vs. 2010)
Cabling ratio74% by 2019
Reduction of waste produced-20% by 2020 (vs. 2015)
Implementation of biodiversity plan
Continuation of protection of species in the “Red List” of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) in the protected areas near plants
Circular economy

Adoption of a systematic approach to the circular economy in the Group Launch of project to assess circular economy impacts Coherent application of the principles of
the circular economy to Future-e projects, considering the circular economy as a key factor in developing the projects

Sustainability Plan 2017-2019